Here’s some screenshots of the news website I designed last week for class. It’s called Chicago Made, and it features some awesome reporting and interactive content from my Medill classmates. 
Next time I make a site, I should probably do some wireframing or design concepts or something. Oh well; those take time. Here’s some screenshots of the news website I designed last week for class. It’s called Chicago Made, and it features some awesome reporting and interactive content from my Medill classmates. 
Next time I make a site, I should probably do some wireframing or design concepts or something. Oh well; those take time. Here’s some screenshots of the news website I designed last week for class. It’s called Chicago Made, and it features some awesome reporting and interactive content from my Medill classmates. 
Next time I make a site, I should probably do some wireframing or design concepts or something. Oh well; those take time.

Here’s some screenshots of the news website I designed last week for class. It’s called Chicago Made, and it features some awesome reporting and interactive content from my Medill classmates. 

Next time I make a site, I should probably do some wireframing or design concepts or something. Oh well; those take time.

Logo for a site I’m designing for class.

It’s called Chicago Made.

If I get the site built by deadline tomorrow, I’ll post it here. Stay tuned.

Cubs v Phillies, April 5 2014.

  1. Camera: HTC One
  2. Aperture: f/-1.9839371772754
  3. Exposure: -0.28005979272015"
  4. Focal Length: 1mm
Tumblr Pro. Love it.

Tumblr Pro. Love it.

I just saw this map showing countries involved in border disputes on the Atlantic’s Tumblr:

It shows that nearly every nation in the world is arguing with at least one other nation about lines on maps. While this is technically true, if you look at the map that they sourced theirs from, you get to see a little more context, that makes the data a seem a little less dramatic:

This map shows that many of the disputes are dormant, and only some countries are currently engaged in conflicts over these disputes. What I don’t get is that while the Atlantic’s adjusted click-bait-y map is bad, they’re only warping their own data. The original source of the map is Quartz, an online publication that the Atlantic owns. Does the Atlantic feel that it needs to skew information to the dramatic extreme to get more clicks? Possibly. I don’t know if I would’ve clicked if the map hadn’t looked so extreme.

I still don’t understand why one side of the Atlantic Media Co. felt fine publishing the map in its original format, and another side had to doctor the map to make it seem more dramatic. Maybe that’s what they felt they needed to do to get people to read. 

As a side note - why are neither of these maps interactive? I’d really like to be able to roll over each country to see who they’re disputing with. The article doesn’t go into detail on each dispute, but presumably whoever made the graphic had the data to be able to colour the map, so they could just throw the data into something like Data Wrapper and bingo, interactive maps all around!

This is the city I live in sometimes, and sometimes it looks pretty nice.

"Spring training is for prospects, peanuts, and Cracker Jack. It’s for the sight of reptilian roadkill on the I-4 near Kissimmee. It’s for the long fade of a Florida sky from baby blue to the milky horizon. Spring training is the momentary stay of romance against relentless rationality."
Louisa Thomas, on Grantland, perfectly describing spring training, and the only experiences I known Florida for in the past decade.

Just came out of Grand Budapest HotelInitial reaction: this is Wes Anderson’s most intricate, ornate and beautiful film to date. 

I quite liked it.

A short film on Hoefler & Frere-Jones. These guys are so awesome and do such great work. It’s nice to get a little peek behind how some of the most enduring typefaces made in the last decade or so have been made.

It’s a shame that these guys probably won’t be working together much longer. 

fastcompany:

Flat Maps Don’t Tell The Whole Story: View The World’s Cities In 3-D
From London to New York, adding the third dimension gives us a better grasp of what lies above and below us in a city. 

This is potentially really awesome.
The future of the Tube map !

fastcompany:

Flat Maps Don’t Tell The Whole Story: View The World’s Cities In 3-D

From London to New York, adding the third dimension gives us a better grasp of what lies above and below us in a city. 

This is potentially really awesome.

The future of the Tube map !

I like how almost the entirety of Philadelphia in this map is listed as “hazardous” or “declining.”

Chicago, through a bridge.

I made a website for class yesterday in about five hours, and I’m pretty happy with how it turned out.